4 replaced http://skeptics.stackexchange.com/ with https://skeptics.stackexchange.com/
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Sometimes claims are made that are unfalsifiable. Evidence could conceivably produced to show the claim is true, but no meaningful test could be produced to show the claim is false.

A silly example might be "Are there any white crows?" could easily be proven True if someone found a white crow, but is practically impossible to prove False.

A more real example is Has there been an Encounter of the Third Kind?Has there been an Encounter of the Third Kind?. It is feasible to prove, with extraordinary evidence, that extra-terrestrials have been in contact with humans, but it is impossible to prove it to be False, even though that is the typical skeptical position.

Another example is about whether governments have broken encryption algorithmswhether governments have broken encryption algorithms. Note: This question does not rely on the supernatural in any way.

A lot of unsupported conspiracy theories thrive on this unfalsifiability.

What should we do with such questions?

  • Should they be closed?
  • Should they be left open until evidence is found (i.e. presumably forever)?
  • Is there an acceptable unreferenced answer that can be provided in these cases?
  • Should they be downvoted into oblivion?

Sometimes claims are made that are unfalsifiable. Evidence could conceivably produced to show the claim is true, but no meaningful test could be produced to show the claim is false.

A silly example might be "Are there any white crows?" could easily be proven True if someone found a white crow, but is practically impossible to prove False.

A more real example is Has there been an Encounter of the Third Kind?. It is feasible to prove, with extraordinary evidence, that extra-terrestrials have been in contact with humans, but it is impossible to prove it to be False, even though that is the typical skeptical position.

Another example is about whether governments have broken encryption algorithms. Note: This question does not rely on the supernatural in any way.

A lot of unsupported conspiracy theories thrive on this unfalsifiability.

What should we do with such questions?

  • Should they be closed?
  • Should they be left open until evidence is found (i.e. presumably forever)?
  • Is there an acceptable unreferenced answer that can be provided in these cases?
  • Should they be downvoted into oblivion?

Sometimes claims are made that are unfalsifiable. Evidence could conceivably produced to show the claim is true, but no meaningful test could be produced to show the claim is false.

A silly example might be "Are there any white crows?" could easily be proven True if someone found a white crow, but is practically impossible to prove False.

A more real example is Has there been an Encounter of the Third Kind?. It is feasible to prove, with extraordinary evidence, that extra-terrestrials have been in contact with humans, but it is impossible to prove it to be False, even though that is the typical skeptical position.

Another example is about whether governments have broken encryption algorithms. Note: This question does not rely on the supernatural in any way.

A lot of unsupported conspiracy theories thrive on this unfalsifiability.

What should we do with such questions?

  • Should they be closed?
  • Should they be left open until evidence is found (i.e. presumably forever)?
  • Is there an acceptable unreferenced answer that can be provided in these cases?
  • Should they be downvoted into oblivion?
    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackSkeptic/status/323389050801254401
3 Added another example.
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Sometimes claims are made that are unfalsifiable. Evidence could conceivably produced to show the claim is true, but no meaningful test could be produced to show the claim is false.

A silly example might be "Are there any white crows?" could easily be proven True if someone found a white crow, but is practically impossible to prove False.

A more real example is Has there been an Encounter of the Third Kind?. It is feasible to prove, with extraordinary evidence, that extra-terrestrials have been in contact with humans, but it is impossible to prove it to be False, even though that is the typical skeptical position.

Another example is about whether governments have broken encryption algorithms. Note: This question does not rely on the supernatural in any way.

A lot of unsupported conspiracy theories thrive on this unfalsifiability.

What should we do with such questions?

  • Should they be closed?
  • Should they be left open until evidence is found (i.e. presumably forever)?
  • Is there an acceptable unreferenced answer that can be provided in these cases?
  • Should they be downvoted into oblivion?

Sometimes claims are made that are unfalsifiable. Evidence could conceivably produced to show the claim is true, but no meaningful test could be produced to show the claim is false.

A silly example might be "Are there any white crows?" could easily be proven True if someone found a white crow, but is practically impossible to prove False.

A more real example is Has there been an Encounter of the Third Kind?. It is feasible to prove, with extraordinary evidence, that extra-terrestrials have been in contact with humans, but it is impossible to prove it to be False, even though that is the typical skeptical position.

A lot of unsupported conspiracy theories thrive on this unfalsifiability.

What should we do with such questions?

  • Should they be closed?
  • Should they be left open until evidence is found (i.e. presumably forever)?
  • Is there an acceptable unreferenced answer that can be provided in these cases?
  • Should they be downvoted into oblivion?

Sometimes claims are made that are unfalsifiable. Evidence could conceivably produced to show the claim is true, but no meaningful test could be produced to show the claim is false.

A silly example might be "Are there any white crows?" could easily be proven True if someone found a white crow, but is practically impossible to prove False.

A more real example is Has there been an Encounter of the Third Kind?. It is feasible to prove, with extraordinary evidence, that extra-terrestrials have been in contact with humans, but it is impossible to prove it to be False, even though that is the typical skeptical position.

Another example is about whether governments have broken encryption algorithms. Note: This question does not rely on the supernatural in any way.

A lot of unsupported conspiracy theories thrive on this unfalsifiability.

What should we do with such questions?

  • Should they be closed?
  • Should they be left open until evidence is found (i.e. presumably forever)?
  • Is there an acceptable unreferenced answer that can be provided in these cases?
  • Should they be downvoted into oblivion?
2 Major rewrite to broadened the question significantly. Hoping for Ilya's approval, else it should be rolled back, and I will ask it separately.
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Should this question about aliens How should unfalsifiable claims be closedhandled?

The question http://skeptics.stackexchange.com/questions/15684/have-extra-terrestrials-ever-been-in-contact-with-humans asks about a claimSometimes claims are made that in my opinion isare unfalsifiable under the criterion of this site for answers.

If I would encounter this claim in any other place I would answer that Evidence could conceivably produced to show the claim doesn't cite any sources or gives any evidenceis true, accept for a man (an astronaut that walked onbut no meaningful test could be produced to show the moon) who claimed that he heard it from other people that they encountered aliens, so we have only hearsay as evidenceclaim is false.

The fact that Government aren't really good at keeping secrets (atom bomb spies, wikileaks, Watergate and more), and that different governments hate each otherA silly example might be "Are there any white crows?" could easily be proven True if someone found a white crow, so many governments and powerful organizations would lovebut is practically impossible to humiliate the US gov. by saying that it hides crucial data from its citizens and create mass panicprove False.

together make this claim not really plausibleA more real example is Has there been an Encounter of the Third Kind?. The problem,It is that that this doesn't meet our standards for an answer, and unless the claimer will confess to lying we have no wayfeasible to prove, with extraordinary evidence, that this claim if false. We can't prove it as trueextra-terrestrials have been in contact with humans, because the governments keepbut it as a secret, and they will not let the informationis impossible to prove it to be published hereFalse, even though that is the typical skeptical position.

So we have an unanswerable question hereA lot of unsupported conspiracy theories thrive on this unfalsifiability.

What should we do with itsuch questions? 

I admit, that the main reason I'm a hesitant to vote to close is because the claimer walked on the moon, and if was someone else, I would have voted to close.

  • Should they be closed?
  • Should they be left open until evidence is found (i.e. presumably forever)?
  • Is there an acceptable unreferenced answer that can be provided in these cases?
  • Should they be downvoted into oblivion?

Should this question about aliens be closed?

The question http://skeptics.stackexchange.com/questions/15684/have-extra-terrestrials-ever-been-in-contact-with-humans asks about a claim that in my opinion is unfalsifiable under the criterion of this site for answers.

If I would encounter this claim in any other place I would answer that the claim doesn't cite any sources or gives any evidence, accept for a man (an astronaut that walked on the moon) who claimed that he heard it from other people that they encountered aliens, so we have only hearsay as evidence.

The fact that Government aren't really good at keeping secrets (atom bomb spies, wikileaks, Watergate and more), and that different governments hate each other, so many governments and powerful organizations would love to humiliate the US gov. by saying that it hides crucial data from its citizens and create mass panic.

together make this claim not really plausible. The problem, is that that this doesn't meet our standards for an answer, and unless the claimer will confess to lying we have no way to prove that this claim if false. We can't prove it as true, because the governments keep it as a secret, and they will not let the information to be published here.

So we have an unanswerable question here.

What should we do with it?

I admit, that the main reason I'm a hesitant to vote to close is because the claimer walked on the moon, and if was someone else, I would have voted to close.

How should unfalsifiable claims be handled?

Sometimes claims are made that are unfalsifiable. Evidence could conceivably produced to show the claim is true, but no meaningful test could be produced to show the claim is false.

A silly example might be "Are there any white crows?" could easily be proven True if someone found a white crow, but is practically impossible to prove False.

A more real example is Has there been an Encounter of the Third Kind?. It is feasible to prove, with extraordinary evidence, that extra-terrestrials have been in contact with humans, but it is impossible to prove it to be False, even though that is the typical skeptical position.

A lot of unsupported conspiracy theories thrive on this unfalsifiability.

What should we do with such questions? 

  • Should they be closed?
  • Should they be left open until evidence is found (i.e. presumably forever)?
  • Is there an acceptable unreferenced answer that can be provided in these cases?
  • Should they be downvoted into oblivion?
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