3 deleted 3 characters in body
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All of the claims are obviously true.

"By controlling the breath, the perfect yogī can continue his life for as long as he likes."

To live forever, all you need to do is continue breathing. It is obvious. If someone is not able to do that, then they are obviously not perfect yogis.

Sometimes we hear from the Vedic literature that some personalities from the Vedic age, such as Vyāsadeva and Aśvatthāmā, are still living.

These stories are demonstrably part of Vedic literature, so it is true that we can hear these stories. Many, if not all other religions have stories about humans with supernatural powers, so it is not even a special claim in the domain of religion.

Seriously: The claim is obviously a religious one. The misunderstanding, resulting in lengthy discussions here, is because in the Western world, the word "yoga" has gained a different meaning, as a basically religion-less exercise system. However, in the context of the claim, "yoga" is a religious practice. The Vedas are religious texts:

Hindus consider the Vedas to be apauruṣeya, which means "not of a man, superhuman"[4] and "impersonal, authorless".

Therefore, we the correct context for the claim is, that a religious person is claiming something based on their religious scriptures, which is off topic on Skeptics SE.

All of the claims are obviously true.

"By controlling the breath, the perfect yogī can continue his life for as long as he likes."

To live forever, all you need to do is continue breathing. It is obvious. If someone is not able to do that, then they are obviously not perfect yogis.

Sometimes we hear from the Vedic literature that some personalities from the Vedic age, such as Vyāsadeva and Aśvatthāmā, are still living.

These stories are demonstrably part of Vedic literature, so it is true that we can hear these stories. Many, if not all other religions have stories about humans with supernatural powers, so it is not even a special claim in the domain of religion.

Seriously: The claim is obviously a religious one. The misunderstanding, resulting in lengthy discussions here, is because in the Western world, the word "yoga" has gained a different meaning, as a basically religion-less exercise system. However, in the context of the claim, "yoga" is a religious practice. The Vedas are religious texts:

Hindus consider the Vedas to be apauruṣeya, which means "not of a man, superhuman"[4] and "impersonal, authorless".

Therefore, we the correct context for the claim is, that a religious person is claiming something based on their religious scriptures, which is off topic on Skeptics SE.

All of the claims are obviously true.

"By controlling the breath, the perfect yogī can continue his life for as long as he likes."

To live forever, all you need to do is continue breathing. It is obvious. If someone is not able to do that, then they are obviously not perfect yogis.

Sometimes we hear from the Vedic literature that some personalities from the Vedic age, such as Vyāsadeva and Aśvatthāmā, are still living.

These stories are demonstrably part of Vedic literature, so it is true that we can hear these stories. Many, if not all other religions have stories about humans with supernatural powers, so it is not even a special claim in the domain of religion.

Seriously: The claim is obviously a religious one. The misunderstanding, resulting in lengthy discussions here, is because in the Western world, the word "yoga" has gained a different meaning, as a basically religion-less exercise system. However, in the context of the claim, "yoga" is a religious practice. The Vedas are religious texts:

Hindus consider the Vedas to be apauruṣeya, which means "not of a man, superhuman"[4] and "impersonal, authorless".

Therefore, the correct context for the claim is, that a religious person is claiming something based on their religious scriptures, which is off topic on Skeptics SE.

2 added 11 characters in body
source | link

All of the claims are obviously true.

"By controlling the breath, the perfect yogī can continue his life for as long as he likes."

To live forever, all you need to do is continue breathing. It is obvious. If someone is not able to do that, then they are obviously not perfect yogis.

Sometimes we hear from the Vedic literature that some personalities from the Vedic age, such as Vyāsadeva and Aśvatthāmā, are still living.

These stories are demonstrably part of Vedic literature, so it is true that we can hear these stories. Many, if not all other religions have stories about humans with supernatural powers, so it is not even a special claim in the domain of religion.

Seriously: The claim is obviously a religious one. The misunderstanding, resulting in lengthy discussions here, is because in the Western world, the word "yoga" has gained a different meaning, as a basically religion-less exercise system. However, in the context of the claim, "yoga" is a religious practice. The Vedas are religious texts:

Hindus consider the Vedas to be apauruṣeya, which means "not of a man, superhuman"[4] and "impersonal, authorless".

Therefore, we the correct context for the claim is, that a religious person is claiming something based on their religious scriptures, which is *off topic** hereoff topic on Skeptics SE.

All of the claims are obviously true.

"By controlling the breath, the perfect yogī can continue his life for as long as he likes."

To live forever, all you need to do is continue breathing. It is obvious. If someone is not able to do that, then they are obviously not perfect yogis.

Sometimes we hear from the Vedic literature that some personalities from the Vedic age, such as Vyāsadeva and Aśvatthāmā, are still living.

These stories are demonstrably part of Vedic literature, so it is true that we can hear these stories. Many, if not all other religions have stories about humans with supernatural powers, so it is not even a special claim in the domain of religion.

Seriously: The claim is obviously a religious one. The misunderstanding, resulting in lengthy discussions here, is because in the Western world, the word "yoga" has gained a different meaning, as a basically religion-less exercise system. However, in the context of the claim, "yoga" is a religious practice. The Vedas are religious texts:

Hindus consider the Vedas to be apauruṣeya, which means "not of a man, superhuman"[4] and "impersonal, authorless".

Therefore, we the correct context for the claim is, that a religious person is claiming something based on their religious scriptures, which is *off topic** here.

All of the claims are obviously true.

"By controlling the breath, the perfect yogī can continue his life for as long as he likes."

To live forever, all you need to do is continue breathing. It is obvious. If someone is not able to do that, then they are obviously not perfect yogis.

Sometimes we hear from the Vedic literature that some personalities from the Vedic age, such as Vyāsadeva and Aśvatthāmā, are still living.

These stories are demonstrably part of Vedic literature, so it is true that we can hear these stories. Many, if not all other religions have stories about humans with supernatural powers, so it is not even a special claim in the domain of religion.

Seriously: The claim is obviously a religious one. The misunderstanding, resulting in lengthy discussions here, is because in the Western world, the word "yoga" has gained a different meaning, as a basically religion-less exercise system. However, in the context of the claim, "yoga" is a religious practice. The Vedas are religious texts:

Hindus consider the Vedas to be apauruṣeya, which means "not of a man, superhuman"[4] and "impersonal, authorless".

Therefore, we the correct context for the claim is, that a religious person is claiming something based on their religious scriptures, which is off topic on Skeptics SE.

1
source | link

All of the claims are obviously true.

"By controlling the breath, the perfect yogī can continue his life for as long as he likes."

To live forever, all you need to do is continue breathing. It is obvious. If someone is not able to do that, then they are obviously not perfect yogis.

Sometimes we hear from the Vedic literature that some personalities from the Vedic age, such as Vyāsadeva and Aśvatthāmā, are still living.

These stories are demonstrably part of Vedic literature, so it is true that we can hear these stories. Many, if not all other religions have stories about humans with supernatural powers, so it is not even a special claim in the domain of religion.

Seriously: The claim is obviously a religious one. The misunderstanding, resulting in lengthy discussions here, is because in the Western world, the word "yoga" has gained a different meaning, as a basically religion-less exercise system. However, in the context of the claim, "yoga" is a religious practice. The Vedas are religious texts:

Hindus consider the Vedas to be apauruṣeya, which means "not of a man, superhuman"[4] and "impersonal, authorless".

Therefore, we the correct context for the claim is, that a religious person is claiming something based on their religious scriptures, which is *off topic** here.