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First, let me check I have understood your concerns, by summarising them in my own words.

  • You don't like people using words like "better", "worse" and "good" without qualification, because they have different meanings in different contexts.
  • Titles have very little context, so these words should not be used.
  • If they are used, it becomes difficult to know whether to answer using the definition provided in the question (i.e. address the question) or your own definition of the words (i.e. address the title).

My answer:

  • Questions asking about "better"/"worse"/"good"/"bad" are often subjective, and out of scope. However, sometimes "better" is objectively defined.
  • Sometimes the meaning of "better" is completely clear from context (e.g. "Is the lifetime of fluoroescent tubes better than incandescent bulbs?") and requires no further definition.
  • Titles should not mislead; if you think they do, edit them.
  • However, it isn't reasonable to expect all terms in the title to be defined in the title. It is acceptable to define them in the question.

Now, let me answer this in a slightly different, more extensive, form, in the hope it can be the basis for a FAQ question one day.

What Makes A Good Title?

  • Primarily, a title should help the reader decide whether they can answer the question or are interested in the answers of others.
  • A title should be concise. This allows people can read many of them quickly.
  • The title should match the question.
  • Unclear terms in the title should be avoided, but if necessary, terms should be defined in the question. (It may be acceptable to state that you are unclear on the definition.)
  • A title should be in the form of a question. ThisIt tends to focus the question onto a particular claim. (This might just be a personal preference, but I find it easier to skim through the list when all the entries have a similar structure.)
  • Between the title and the tags, keywords relating to the question should appear. This helps search-engines and people looking for known questions in a list.
  • Ideally, the title should be inviting. People will find the site more interesting to peruse if the topics we discuss sound interesting. At the same time, it shouldn't detract from other questions by using tricks to grab attention without merit.

First, let me check I have understood your concerns, by summarising them in my own words.

  • You don't like people using words like "better", "worse" and "good" without qualification, because they have different meanings in different contexts.
  • Titles have very little context, so these words should not be used.
  • If they are used, it becomes difficult to know whether to answer using the definition provided in the question (i.e. address the question) or your own definition of the words (i.e. address the title).

My answer:

  • Questions asking about "better"/"worse"/"good"/"bad" are often subjective, and out of scope. However, sometimes "better" is objectively defined.
  • Sometimes the meaning of "better" is completely clear from context (e.g. "Is the lifetime of fluoroescent tubes better than incandescent bulbs?") and requires no further definition.
  • Titles should not mislead; if you think they do, edit them.
  • However, it isn't reasonable to expect all terms in the title to be defined in the title. It is acceptable to define them in the question.

Now, let me answer this in a slightly different, more extensive, form, in the hope it can be the basis for a FAQ question one day.

What Makes A Good Title?

  • Primarily, a title should help the reader decide whether they can answer the question or are interested in the answers of others.
  • A title should be concise. This allows people can read many of them quickly.
  • The title should match the question.
  • Unclear terms in the title should be avoided, but if necessary, terms should be defined in the question. (It may be acceptable to state that you are unclear on the definition.)
  • A title should be in the form of a question. This might just be a personal preference, but I find it easier to skim through the list when all the entries have a similar structure.
  • Between the title and the tags, keywords relating to the question should appear. This helps search-engines and people looking for known questions in a list.
  • Ideally, the title should be inviting. People will find the site more interesting to peruse if the topics we discuss sound interesting. At the same time, it shouldn't detract from other questions by using tricks to grab attention without merit.

First, let me check I have understood your concerns, by summarising them in my own words.

  • You don't like people using words like "better", "worse" and "good" without qualification, because they have different meanings in different contexts.
  • Titles have very little context, so these words should not be used.
  • If they are used, it becomes difficult to know whether to answer using the definition provided in the question (i.e. address the question) or your own definition of the words (i.e. address the title).

My answer:

  • Questions asking about "better"/"worse"/"good"/"bad" are often subjective, and out of scope. However, sometimes "better" is objectively defined.
  • Sometimes the meaning of "better" is completely clear from context (e.g. "Is the lifetime of fluoroescent tubes better than incandescent bulbs?") and requires no further definition.
  • Titles should not mislead; if you think they do, edit them.
  • However, it isn't reasonable to expect all terms in the title to be defined in the title. It is acceptable to define them in the question.

Now, let me answer this in a slightly different, more extensive, form, in the hope it can be the basis for a FAQ question one day.

What Makes A Good Title?

  • Primarily, a title should help the reader decide whether they can answer the question or are interested in the answers of others.
  • A title should be concise. This allows people can read many of them quickly.
  • The title should match the question.
  • Unclear terms in the title should be avoided, but if necessary, terms should be defined in the question. (It may be acceptable to state that you are unclear on the definition.)
  • A title should be in the form of a question. It tends to focus the question onto a particular claim. (This might just be a personal preference, but I find it easier to skim through the list when all the entries have a similar structure.)
  • Between the title and the tags, keywords relating to the question should appear. This helps search-engines and people looking for known questions in a list.
  • Ideally, the title should be inviting. People will find the site more interesting to peruse if the topics we discuss sound interesting. At the same time, it shouldn't detract from other questions by using tricks to grab attention without merit.
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First, let me check I have understood your concerns, by summarising them in my own words.

  • You don't like people using words like "better", "worse" and "good" without qualification, because they have different meanings in different contexts.
  • Titles have very little context, so these words should not be used.
  • If they are used, it becomes difficult to know whether to answer using the definition provided in the question (i.e. address the question) or your own definition of the words (i.e. address the title).

My answer:

  • Questions asking about "better"/"worse"/"good"/"bad" are often subjective, and out of scope. However, sometimes "better" is objectively defined.
  • Sometimes the meaning of "better" is completely clear from context (e.g. "Is the lifetime of fluoroescent tubes better than incandescent bulbs?") and requires no further definition.
  • Titles should not mislead; if you think they do, edit them.
  • However, it isn't reasonable to expect all terms in the title to be defined in the title. It is acceptable to define them in the question.

Now, let me answer this in a slightly different, more extensive, form, in the hope it can be the basis for a FAQ question one day.

What Makes A Good Title?

  • Primarily, a title should help the reader decide whether they can answer the question or are interested in the answers of others.
  • A title should be concise. This allows people can read many of them quickly.
  • The title should match the question.
  • Unclear terms in the title should be avoided, but if necessary, terms should be defined in the question. (It may be acceptable to state that you are unclear on the definition.)
  • A title should be in the form of a question. This might just be a personal preference, but I find it easier to skim through the list when all the entries have a similar structure.
  • Between the title and the tags, keywords relating to the question should appear. This helps search-engines and people looking for known questions in a list.
  • Ideally, the title should be inviting. People will find the site more interesting to peruse if the topics we discuss sound interesting. At the same time, it shouldn't detract from other questions by using tricks to grab attention without merit.