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Is toilet paper roll orientation related to personality?

I think you can see what happened... I just don't understand the behavior of people who stopped by. One person copied and pasted some of the article I linked to into the answer, but then deleted it 5 hours later (perhaps on the basis of a comment I made that they didn't like?).

I then tried to repost it and answer everyone's questions and another person deleted it without any rationale.

Perhaps someone can explain if there is some rule I am breaking, I seem to have managed much better at all the other sites! ;)

Thanks!

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Hello and welcome to our site =)

Please take 10 minutes and read through FAQ: Welcome to New Users. We are a bit different from other sites in the network (or on the internet!).

I did not notice that your reference was already in the post. Another moderator mentioned to you that your answer was not, in fact, answering the question because of this -- it was merely repeating the question in other words.

Now, answers have to ...answer the question, clearly and yours didn't. The other moderator warned you of this:

This isn't an answer. That you found nothing in Google Scholar doesn't mean there is nothing. That the claim was from Kimberley-Clark doesn't mean it was wrong. – Oddthinking♦

Maybe he was not clear, however non-answers are routinely deleted everywhere in the stack exchange network, and maybe he assumed you knew that. Possibly because of this you didn't think of fixing it and commented this:

Well then find something and prove me wrong. Also, I think this subject lends itself to ridiculousness, and a falsified study for the sake of publicity would not be out of the question. – jferr

Which I can only interpret as "if you don't like this, can you write your own answer? I like my own". However this leaves us with two problems

  1. The answer is not an answer, and unlikely to be fixed in the near future
  2. There's a discussion possibly starting in the comments, which we'd really like to avoid.

Based on those two points I've made the call to remove the answer. It's not a permanent deletion, but you do need to change it so it answers the question, supported by verifiable evidence.

Sometimes it's hard to answer a question in the negative -- in fact we do have a policy of not answering questions which lack evidence. Maybe, if your Google Scholar search do not return results, this is one such case.

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  • Hi and thanks for the reply. I answered that there is data to believe the claims made, and specifically they came from Kimberly-Clark. The original poster believed they came from onlineengineeringdegree.com, a site which may have had something to do with the infographic but is not the underlying basis for the claims. Is it regular policy to leave questions that cannot be positively refuted unanswered? And to delete answers which support the idea that they cannot be refuted? – jmabs Jan 19 '15 at 2:04
  • If we can't definitively support or refute them, they are generally left unanswered, until someone can. One solution is to quote a expert who has done a literature search and concluded there was no evidence. It is subject to "Appeal to Authority" fallacy, but alas, sometimes it is the best we can do. Your answer was insufficient to support the idea it could not be answered. – Oddthinking Jan 19 '15 at 7:39

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