3

My question from August 2015 got closed as too broad because it had too many statements (8) to check. OK.

But recently we had this one with 6 statements, and I remember seeing a similar one not too long ago (but can't re-find it, sorry).

Please look at this one too, it is somewhat related.

Where do we set the limit?

3

The intent of restricting questions to fewer claims is to limit the effort needed to give a complete answer, as the Stack Exchange system has a single accept and requires one answer to be the better one to work fully.

As long as the effort required is reasonably limited, I personally see no issue in having more than one claim. The more closely related the claims are, the more numerous they can be, in a single question.

In fact, multiple claims should be grouped together in some cases in order to limit effort! For example, a single claim can have multiple slightly different versions and I would expect that all versions are grouped in a single question.

For these reasons I'm weary of specifying an exact number. In cases like the one you present, probably choosing one or two representative claims is best, for example asking whether immigrants in UK contribute more than they take seems to be a feasible alternative.

  • Great perspective! It is really not so much about the number as it is how tightly coupled the claims are. – called2voyage Oct 12 '16 at 19:54
  • @MohammadSakibArifin "In fact, multiple claims should be grouped together in some cases in order to limit effort!" - It all came from one meme being questioned by one user. That sounds like a good case for grouping multiple claims to limit effort. – called2voyage Dec 8 '16 at 18:46
  • @called2voyage "For these reasons I'm weary of specifying an exact number. In cases like the one you present, probably choosing one or two* representative claims is best," – Sakib Arifin Dec 8 '16 at 18:50
  • @MohammadSakibArifin I think the emphasis should be on the first sentence and not the second. The one or two is meant to be taken loosely. Three is pretty close to one or two. – called2voyage Dec 8 '16 at 18:53
  • Oddthinking said: "In my opinion: One. Two at the outside, if they are closely related. The StackExchange system seems to work best when you only have one question." – Sakib Arifin Dec 8 '16 at 18:54
  • @MohammadSakibArifin He also only has a score of one with a dissenting comment with one upvote. This answer has a score of three. This is how consensus is determined on Meta. – called2voyage Dec 8 '16 at 22:00
2

In my opinion: One. Two at the outside, if they are closely related.

The StackExchange system seems to work best when you only have one question.

The difficulty is you can have an excellent answer with fantastic references that definitively addresses one of the claims, ... but nothing on the other claims, so your answer can't stand by itself.

If the same claimant (e.g. a meme) makes multiple claims, ask multiple questions - ideally spacing them out over time so you don't bore the readers, and so any fixes required for the first claim can be easily applied to the second and subsequent questions.

I am not sure if that has ever been put to the community, so at this stage I offer it only as an opinion, not a community standard.

  • 1
    I disagree. The ability to answer one claim is a valid answer and should be upvoted per the tooltip ("This answer is useful"). If it requires a collaboration of multiple users, then there exists the community wiki option for answers. There are plenty of examples over on Puzzling.SE. I would instead suggest that it be limited by the resource inspiring the question. If there's a picture with X claims, then having that full image will be helpful not only for research but also as reference for others searching for the answer. – David Starkey Oct 11 '16 at 15:47

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